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Table 1 Research articles published 2010-2020 on caregiver satisfaction with youth mental health services in the United States

From: Revisiting caregiver satisfaction with children’s mental health services in the United States

First Author Pub. Year Conceptualization Measure Use Results Service Setting Notes
Acri 2016 Defined as viewing the process and outcomes associated with treatment favorably; parents’ opinions about helpfulness of groups, the importance of therapy for families, and family improvements as a result of treatment Metropolitan Area Child Study process measures program satisfaction subscale Satisfaction in relationship to clinical, population, or service variables Satisfaction with treatment was predictive of reductions in problematic child behaviors and parent stress independently; no difference between treatment groups Outpatient clinic  
Beltran 2016 Indicator of engagement in mental health services Study-specific researcher-developed measure Satisfaction as feasibility component for new intervention Satisfaction ratings were high for parents & children Outpatient clinic Also measured child satisfaction
Bonach 2010 Examining how performance of different multidisciplinary agencies vary in the eyes of the consumer, how they shape consumer's experience; find ways to improve and refine service delivery Study-specific researcher-developed measure Satisfaction in relationship to clinical, population, or service variables Caregivers reported fairly high satisfaction with Children's Advocacy Center (CAC). Separated CAC functions, showing that satisfaction with services delivered by the CAC (information and logistical coordination, responsiveness and provision of comfort for child victims and non-offending caregivers, and staff courteousness and helpfulness) was important in predicting overall CAC satisfaction Children's advocacy center  
Burt 2014 Caregiver satisfaction with the discussion of behavioral health topics with the provider Promoting Healthy Development Survey- Modified Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Intervention group (integrating behavioral health provider into well-child visit) parent satisfaction was not higher than control (standard well-child visit); overall satisfaction was highly related to perceived helpfulness Primary care  
Cama 2020 Parents’ satisfaction with the role of the primary care physician (PCP) in the treatment of their child’s mental health problems after their PCP consulted Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project (MCPAP) Study-specific researcher-developed measure Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Parents expressed high rates of satisfaction; positive patient-doctor relationship related to higher satisfaction Primary care  
Chavira 2014 Parent level of satisfaction with the intervention that their child received Parent Consumer Satisfaction Scale Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Parent satisfaction at post-treatment and 3-month follow-up was high for both groups, no significant difference between treatment groups Cross-Setting: outpatient (control) and telehealth (intervention)  
Coker 2019 Examined satisfaction with the referral process and the care received 2 adapted items from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems [CAHPS] Health Plan Survey Satisfaction as feasibility component for new intervention Parents in the intervention group reported higher satisfaction with the referral system and with care overall Cross-setting: primary care clinic and outpatient clinic; intervention-only: telehealth  
Cook 2010 Satisfaction as a component of the caregiver’s perception of his or her system of care service experiences over the last 6 months YSS-F Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Higher levels of perceived support related positively to parental satisfaction with services received Cross-setting: system of care Also measured child satisfaction
Dvir 2012 Conceptualized parent satisfaction with services as the difference between families’ expectations of care and their actual experience of care. Measured general satisfaction with services and with the evaluation process by psychiatrist/psychiatric nurse clinician, and satisfaction with the follow up and mental health referral process Study-specific researcher-developed measure Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Most parents were satisfied with services, and reported being better satisfied with service in this program compared to previous contact with mental health providers. No significant group differences in satisfaction by minority status, visit status, or co-morbidity status. High rates of parents reporting they felt prepared, heard, and understood; lower satisfaction was reported with wait times to get services in the community Primary care  
Farmer 2011 Satisfaction with health services: primary care, specialty care, emergency room, inpatient; and separately, satisfaction with mental health services Study-specific researcher-developed measure Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Intervention group (care coordination) reported greater satisfaction with mental health services & therapies than the waitlist control group Primary care (medical home) Also measured physician satisfaction
Fawley-King 2013 Satisfaction with services for their child: measured overall satisfaction with services, positive outcomes as a result of services, and having support outside the mental health system YSS-F Satisfaction in relationship to clinical, population, or service variables Caregivers were highly satisfied with their child's treatment; higher general satisfaction predicted higher number of caregiver participation activities and the caregiver being more likely to carry out therapist's recommendations at home Outpatient clinic  
Fawley-King 2014 Mothers' satisfaction with the Triple P program Study-specific researcher-developed measure Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Mothers reported high rates of satisfaction with the intervention, and almost all reported if they needed help again, they would definitely return to the Triple P program Outpatient clinic  
Gerdes 2019 Part of engagement & acceptability outcomes Therapy Attitude Inventory (TAI) Satisfaction as feasibility component for new intervention High satisfaction with both arms, but mothers reported higher satisfaction with the culturally-adapted evidence-based treatments (EBTs) than the regular EBT Cross-setting: outpatient clinic (control) and community-based (intervention)  
Haine-Schlagel 2013 Using parent report to assess perceived effectiveness of treatment Multidimensional Adolescent Satisfaction Scale (MASS), adapted for parents Satisfaction in relationship to clinical, population, or service variables Parents may be more satisfied with care that integrates common elements of evidence-based treatments Outpatient clinic  
Jacob 2012 3 domains of satisfaction reported to be highly correlated with global satisfaction for pediatric telemedicine patients: 1) technical functioning 2) comfort of patient and provider with the technology and perceived privacy 3) timely and geographic access to care Parent Satisfaction Survey (Meyers 2008- specifically for telepsychiatry) Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention High parental satisfaction Cross-setting: primary care clinic and telehealth Also measured primary care physician satisfaction
Kolko 2010 Parent perception of treatment acceptability & helpfulness CSQ-8 Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Intervention group parents (on-site behavioral intervention from pediatric nurse) reported significantly greater satisfaction than control group (enhanced usual care) Cross-setting: outpatient clinic (control) and primary care (intervention)  
Kolko 2012 Family impressions of services & of the study CSQ-8 Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Intervention group parents (doctor's office collaborative care) were highly satisfied Primary care Also measured pediatrician satisfaction
Liddle 2011 Construct to test implementation feasibility SSS-16 Satisfaction as feasibility component for new intervention Intervention group children & parents were more satisfied than enhanced SAU group Cross-setting: juvenile justice detention center, community-based, home-based, and outpatient Also measured child satisfaction
Mayworm 2020 Measuring three domains of satisfaction important in telepsychiatry: technical functioning, comfort with technology and privacy, and access to care Parent Satisfaction Survey (Meyers 2008- specifically for telepsychiatry) Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Parents were equally & highly satisfied with telepsychiatry & in-person psychiatry services Cross-setting: school-based in-person and telehealth Also measure child & provider satisfaction
Radigan 2014 Measure of appropriateness of care, cultural sensitivity, access, participation, outcomes/functioning, medication management, global satisfaction, and social connectedness Family Assessment of Care Satisfaction Survey (FACS)- created in New York State; based on national satisfaction survey YSS-F, with local input Satisfaction as feasibility component for new intervention Greater proportion of those with access to family peer advocates (FPAs) responded positively (than those without FPAs) to satisfaction overall, and specifically to satisfaction with access to services, appropriateness of services, and participation in services Cross-setting: inpatient and outpatient Also measured child satisfaction
Salloum 2015 Acceptability to parents, as a factor affecting implementation CSQ-8 Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Parents & children had high satisfaction levels; parents slightly higher than children Outpatient clinic Also measured child satisfaction
Stadnick 2012 Measuring parents’ views on the effectiveness of therapy over the past 5 months Perceived Effectiveness Subscale of the Multidimensional Adolescent Satisfaction Scale (Caregiver Report Version), plus study-specific researcher developed measure Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Parents reported high level of satisfaction with therapy & that their therapist was effective in working with the child Outpatient clinic  
Storch 2015 Metric of treatment acceptability CSQ-8 Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Computerized CBT group had high satisfaction rating from both parents & children Outpatient clinic Also measured child satisfaction
Thomas 2018 Measuring overall acceptability, effectiveness, and efficiency Previously validated telemedicine survey (Yip 2003) Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Parents & providers rated high satisfaction; providers slightly lower than parents Cross-setting: emergency department and urgent care center; intervention-only: telehealth Also measured provider satisfaction
Trask 2015 Satisfaction as a gauge of quality of care; overall satisfaction with services, positive outcomes as a result of services, and cultural sensitivity scales YSS-F Satisfaction in relationship to clinical, population, or service variables Youth & caregivers had higher satisfaction when clinicians discussed and practiced common elements of evidence-based treatments; consistent across general satisfaction, satisfaction with cultural sensitivity, and satisfaction with outcomes Outpatient clinic Also measured child satisfaction
Turchik 2010 Satisfaction as a distinct construct from outcomes; consumer satisfaction important in effectiveness/quality of services, to increase consumer input in service delivery. Parent satisfaction as specifically important because they are involved in treatment plan and bring the child to therapy The Ohio Scales- Satisfaction Scale Satisfaction in relationship to clinical, population, or service variables Parents reported greater satisfaction than the children, but reported lower functioning & higher problem severity scores than children. Parents of younger children reported higher satisfaction; parents of older kids reported lower satisfaction, but the older kids reported higher satisfaction than younger kids. Demographic/clinical outcome variables do not account for much variation. Improvements in functioning/reduction in symptoms were related to satisfaction but small in magnitude Outpatient clinic Also measured child satisfaction
Williams 2011 Measure of acceptability Study-specific researcher-developed measure Satisfaction as outcome for established intervention Most parents reported high acceptability scores Emergency department Also measured child satisfaction