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Table 1 Features, evidence base and benefits of the system

From: Supporting mental health, wellbeing and study skills in Higher Education: an online intervention system

MePlusMe feature Theory/evidence Benefit for user Benefit for HEI
Online access Effectiveness of online therapies [19] Ease and flexibility of access
Anonymity (removal of stigma)
Freeing up resources in SSS for students with more severe difficulties
Visual appearance, language and layout designed specifically for students Proof-of-concept study—end-user feedback [21,22,23] High engagement levels
Inclusive
A system that is ‘fit-for-purpose’ and highly usable
Marketing their different support services tailored for students
Ability to personalise page (both for user and HEI) Personalising a product can strengthen emotional bond [23] Strengthens emotional bond to system. Student takes ownership Marketing possibilities (white labelling)
Use of multimedia (animated videos, etc.) Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning [24] Enhanced learning environment Claiming variability in the different offerings for students’ support
Assessment measure (Questionnaire) developed from validated clinical tools HADS [25]
GAD-7 [26]
PHQ-9 [27]
MINI [28]
Accurate identification of needs. Best-fit intervention Untrained staff (e.g., personal tutors) can use the Questionnaire as a first-line symptom identification tool
Evidence-based techniques used (e.g., normalisation, promoting wellbeing, problem solving, study skills) CBT [29], behavioural activation [30]
cognitive defusion [31,32,33]
High effectiveness in addressing symptoms, enhancing general wellbeing and increase academic self-efficacy Fit-for purpose
Availability of granular statistics analysis Data granularity allows for a better analysis of data [34] Indirectly, as HEI allocate resources better and are able to adequately support students Improvement of resource allocation. Stakeholder accountability
Improvement of reputation and profitability
Branding opportunity to be labelled as the “caring” university